Roman Hankeln

Principal Investigator

E-mail: roman.hankeln@hf.ntnu.no

 

Prof. Dr. Roman Hankeln is professor for the history of medieval music at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology at Trondheim, Norway where he is active as researcher and academic teacher at the Institute of History as well as at the Institute of Music (see http://www.ntnu.no/ihk and http://www.ntnu.no/musikk).

In 2009 Hankeln was elected chairman of the study group Cantus Planus, a section of the International Musicological Society. Cantus Planus is devoted to the study of plainchant in its history and presence (see http://www.cantusplanus.org/). Since 2004 Hankeln is a member of the Editor’s Board of the Series Historiae launched by the Study Group.

Hankeln’s main research activities centre on text, musical structure, style and socio-political context of medieval liturgical vocal music. Hankeln studied with David Hiley at the University of Regensburg, Germany. Hankeln’s doctoral dissertation (ed. 1999) edited and described the corpus of Aquitanian Offertory-Prosulas (the offertory topic was taken up again in the conference report The offertory and its verses, 2007). Hankeln’s special interest in liturgical music as it was sung during the Divine Office in honour of medieval saints (so called “Historiae”) goes back to his engagement in a project of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft 1996-1999 (editions in 1998 and 2000). The historio-political dimensions of “Historiae” for sainted medieval rulers have been the topic of several of Hankeln’s writings, as well as the essay collection Political Plainchant? Approaches to the relationship of music, text and political context in medieval Historiae, Ottawa: The Institute of Mediaeval Music 2009 (Musicological Studies, 111).

Hankeln’s second main field of research is devoted to the German Lied and its poetry around 1800. His engagement at the Institute of Musicology Weimar-Jena (1999–2004) resulted in his Habilitationschrift Kompositionsproblem Klassik, which is about to be published in 2011 at Böhlau. It studies the impact of classical verse structures as they were taken over by German poets like Klopstock, Herder and Goethe on the Lieder-compositions of the late 18th century Berlin composer Johann Friedrich Reichardt and some of his contemporaries (Gluck, Neefe).

 

Project related publications